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Micro-entrepreneur, are you one?

I was browsing through a new [to me] informational website by The Direct Selling Association, directselling411.com, and came across this wonderful paragraph:

  •  “…An estimated 15.2 million people are involved in direct selling in the United States and more than 59 million worldwide. Most are women, though nearly a third are men or two-person teams such as couples. The vast majority are independent business people – they are micro-entrepreneurs [emphasis mine] whose purpose is to sell the product and/or services of the company they voluntarily choose to represent – not employees of the company. Approximately 90 percent of all direct sellers operate their businesses part-time….” [directselling411.com]

I love that little phrase micro-entrepreneur.  As an Independent Distributor, with a home-based business with the direct selling company I represent, I see myself as a micro-entrepreneurWhat’s an entrepreneur anyway?

If I were to give an off-the-cuff definition – most everyone thinks they know what an entrepreneur is or does – I’d have to say this:

  • an entrepreneur is an independent business person; someone who owns their own business; someone who started with little and grew their business into something bigger

Guy Kawasaki , in his book, The Art of the Start, says this about an entrepreneur:

  • “…The truth is that no one really knows if he is an entrepreneur until he becomes one-and sometimes not even then. There really is only one question you should ask yourself before starting any new venture: Do I want to make meaning?…”

He goes on to say that “…meaning is not about money, power, or prestige…Among the meanings of ‘meaning’ are to

  • Make the world a better place.
  • Increase the quality of life.
  • Right a terrible wrong.
  • Prevent the end of something good….”

I like his definition.  Using it I can revamp my own view of being an entrepreneur and using myself as an example, can say that my goals as an entrepreneur are to

  1. make the world a better place for my immediate family right from the get-go; once I know my family is benefiting, then extend my field of financial influence to help in my community and in causes that are brought to my heart. 
  2. increase the quality of life  for my family; then help through causes I find important, help others.
  3. right a terrible wrong – there is a very personal one that I would love the leverage to effect – help make positive changes in the current state of the American health care system.  Someone very close to me is suffering because of the inefficiencies [and to my mind, capriciousness] of our current system.
  4. prevent the end of something good– one of the reasons I am involved with the direct selling company that I chose is that it directly [through various means] helps to save acreages of trees in the Amazonian rainforest.  Without oxygen everyone on this planet will die.

I’ve sited this definition  for entrepreneur from Entrepreneur.com before, but it bears repeating:

  • “…Someone who assumes the financial risk of the initiation, operation and management of a business….”

 Again I use myself as an example of a micro-entrepreneur and using the short definition above from Entrepreneur.com can say that yes, I assumed the financial risk of starting, operating and managing my own home-based business.  What I can also say is that because I chose the direct selling industry, and I chose the direct selling company I did to become associated with as an Independent Distributor, the risk was and is very small.  It only cost me $39 initial sign-in fees.  My company has fantastic tools that aid in the operating and managing of my business.

I will answer my own post title question of: Micro-entrepreneur, are you one? with a Yes!  I am.

Are you? 

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One Response

  1. this post is good, it can help me.
    Thanks you

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